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Melody in A minor

Let’s practice using the fixes I suggested in the last post. We’ll do this by making a progression in A minor, and by using some of the scales I talked about in earlier posts.

 

http://davewallmusic.com/soloing/

http://davewallmusic.com/a-bunch-of-notes-for-the-blues-2/

 

Everything you’ve done with these scales should begin to give you a flexible sense of melody. Playing them over the blues gives you one sense of melody. Playing them over a progression in A minor will give you a different sense of melody.

 

Chords in A minor

Make a progression in A minor.  Here are the chords you can use to do that.

 

Amin             Bdim             Cmaj             Dmin            Emin             Fmaj             Gmaj

 

If you’ve read one of my earlier posts, you’ll know that these are the same chords as C major.

 

http://davewallmusic.com/improvisation/

 

In A minor you can use Emaj instead of Emin, and G#dim instead of Gmaj.

 

Taking a look at my posts on songwriting (see main menu) will help you put a progression together if you need help. And remember to use the fixes I talked about in the last post.

 

Playing the scales

Use minor pentatonic, dorian, and the blues scale. Major pentatonic won’t work on a minor progression.

 

After using the blues progression, soloing over a regular progression will be a bit of a revelation. Notice how your playing changes. The blues progression tends to make you play blues clichés. A progression in a minor key (or a major key) encourages a different melodic approach.

 

Play around with this. Pay attention to the kind of melody each of the three scales make you want to play. This will give you a sense of what you like.

 

In the next post, I’ll talk about writing riffs that work as a hook.

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